Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Foothold

Foothold

A foothold is a point on a cliff face where a climber places his foot, which allows him upward progress. There are three basic types of footholds: smears (also called friction holds) where a rock shoe smears against the rock surface for purchase; edges where a rock shoe is placed on a protruding edge or shelf, which is usually a positive hold; and toe holds, which is when aclimber sticks the toe of his rock shoe into a pocket or places the toe on a foothold.

Crimp hilds

Crimp

A small handhold that a rock climber utilizes by using his fingertips on an edge, a narrow ledge of rock that ranges from the width of a dime to about an inch. The hold is also called a crimper. The action of grabbing the hold is called crimping. Crimp holds are not used often because they are very strenuous and it's easy to injure and stress fingers. Sometimes the thumb is wrapped around the index finger on a crimp hold to give more pulling power.

BUCKET HOLD

BUCKET: Definition of a Climbing Slang Word

A bucket is a large handhold that fills a climber’s hand like he’s grabbing the edge of a bucket. A large handhold is also called a jug, a Thank God Hold, and a wrapper. Buckets are found on many routes and are usually great for hanging from your arms and resting. A bucket can also be a foothold big enough for one or two feet to comfortably step onto.

Jugs holds

Jugs

Large handholds that are big enough to wrap you hands around. Or Juggy, which is a section of a route with large handholds, which makes the climbing easy.

Granite

Granite is a common intrusive igneous rock with a generally coarse and crystalline texture that widely occurs throughout the world.
Granite, usually an ancient rock that forms continents and mountain ranges, is an excellent medium for rock climbing with clean crack systems, face holds like chickenheads, and offers superlative friction for slab climbing. Some of the best climbing areas in the United States are composed of various types of granite, including Yosemite Valley, Tuolumne Meadows, Joshua Tree, Cochise Stronghold, Longs Peak and Rocky Mountain National Park, and Cathedral and Whitehorse Ledges
.



     An edge is a handhold or foothold on a climbing route that is a small, sharp ledge on a rock face. This narrow ledge or shelf ranges in thickness from the width of a dime to three or so inches wide. The bigger and wider an edge is, the easier it is to use as a hold.
A climber uses an edge on a rock face as a fooAn edge is a handhold or foothold on a climbing route that is a small, sharp ledge on a rock face. This narrow ledge or shelf ranges in thickness from the width of a dime to three or so inches wide. The bigger and wider an edge is, the easier it is to use as a hold.
A climber uses an edge on a rock face as a foothold when he stands on it with his rock shoes. This foot technique is called edging; it usually requires a stiff rock shoe to support the climber's weight, depending on the width and size of the
A climber can also use an edge as a handhold by using crimping techniques or grabbing the hold with an open hand grip. Edges form most of the handholds found on climbing routes.
thold when he stands on it with his rock shoes. This foot technique is called edging; it usually requires a stiff rock shoe to support the climber's weight, depending on the width and size of the edge.
A climber can also use an edge as a handhold by using crimping techniques or grabbing the hold with an open hand grip. Edges form most of the handholds found on climbing route